Persian farmerToday’s story concerns Northam resident, Abdallah Mahomet, who was living there in 1849. Abdallah was a Persian (modern day Iranian), who worked as a farm labourer.

But poor Abdallah never had any luck.

He started saving in 1841, only to have all his possessions (and £27 in cash) destroyed in a fire in 1845. A man of stoic character, he resolved to start again.

He built up a small farm, but in 1847 his three cows and heifer calf were stolen.

Did Abdallah give up? No! He cheerily said to himself “He who has not got cannot lose”, and started over once again.

But 1849 turned out to be a particularly bad year. Abdallah was slandered by a man called Hookham John, who claimed that Mr Mahomet was bankrupt and owed him money. The legal fees to set the record straight cost him a fortune.

And now comes the truly pathetic part. A woman (whom he bitterly refers to by the name of ‘Money’) came to his home and promised to be his wife.

Falling instantly in love, Abdallah bought her dresses, shawls, silk handkerchiefs, and the like.

But ‘Money’ was not faithful. Here we’ll let Abdallah tell his own story:

‘Money’ is flashing about with my property, bought with my money, on condition that she became my wife and made me a comfortable home. ‘Money’ has run away with my property, even to my very blankets!

I have spent, besides £29 on other goods, fruits, wines, etc., which she ought to return as they do not belong to her.

I reckon my loss altogether at £74, all through you, which is a great loss for a labouring man, and all is lost by cheating and roguery.

Not only that, but by spending so much time chasing after the floozy, Abdallah lost his job on the farm at Northam.

“I have lost 1849,” he sobbed. “I hope I shall not lose 1850.”

Abdallah relocated to Geraldton, where he ran a small market garden and where he drank himself to death in 1880.

I will allow the reader to draw their own moral from this sad tale. Although becoming disillusioned with love forever would be the most reasonable response.